Get the awesome construction innovation content in your inbox every week

Give it a try—it only takes a click to unsubscribe.

Creativity

Bobtrade's Best: Skyscrapers

Alice-India Garwood
by Alice-India Garwood on December 10, 2018

At Bobtrade, we live for creativity and striking design and watching the face of the city change right before our eyes. Whether it means innovating to make the world’s tallest skyscraper possible, or changing the way we look at building materials, we can’t wait to see a sustainable future. So, to celebrate what has been a massive year for us at Bobtrade HQ we wanted to share with you some of our favourite skyscrapers.

First off, let’s start a little closer to home: The Tulip

From the designers of London’s famous Gherkin comes the Tulip tower is the talk of the town.

Standing at 1000ft tall the tower is fitted with interior slides and exterior glass pods for members of the public to ride. The Tulip won’t be offices or for residential use, but will be a tourist attraction.

Bobtrade, innovation, skyscrapers, construction, materials, building, supplies[Photo Credit: ABC News]

One exciting detail to this proposal is that designers Foster + Partners want to offer 20,000 state school children free visits each year so that they can enjoy the view and engage with London’s past, present and future.

"The Tulip will be a tourist attraction."

From smooth curved lines in London, to a flat iron in New York.

The Flat Iron building in New York City was designed by Daniel Burnham, in a small plot in New York City. To build in this small space with stone would have been impossible without making the ground floor increasingly smaller.

Daniel Burnham up with the idea of a steel skeleton for his 22 story project.

Bobtrade, innovation, skyscrapers, construction, materials, building, supplies[Photo Credit: Untapped Cities]

The steel columns and beams making up the skeleton of the building had a thin layer of masonry hung over it’s sides like a curtain, which is why you can’t necessarily tell the building wasn’t made of stone!

This meant we could make taller and taller buildings without compromising the foundations they are built on or space for residents on the lower floors. The use of a steel skeleton on this project is one of the reasons we now have skyscrapers like the Shard and the Burj Khalifa.

Although it doesn’t reach the dizzying heights of the Empire State Building or indeed the Burj, we still have a fondness for the Flat Iron building.

Now, how about something a little more sustainable?

This is The Tree in Norway.

The Trees’ developer, the Bergen and Omegn Building Society have said that using timber to build this tower represents an important step towards reducing global warming.

Bobtrade, innovation, skyscrapers, construction, materials, building, supplies[Photo Credit: Timber Design and Technology]

More than 21,000 metrics of carbon dioxide emissions were avoided in the construction of this skyscraper which as outstanding.

"21,000 metrics of carbon dioxide emissions were avoided in the construction of this skyscraper."

49 meters tall, the building is held up with structural glulam timber columns, while the floor and walls were formed using cross-laminated timber. The Tree was completed in 2015, and sits on the historic Bergen waterfront.

It’s also pretty beautiful. The Tree is an all-rounder.

Another innovative skyscraper that caught our eye was the Tower at PNC Plaza.

You may not believe this but the Tower at PNC Plaza has actually been designed so that it can both inhale and exhale, allowing those working inside to enjoy a fresh circulation of air.

By combining a double skin facade with a solar chimney, the designers managed to achieve what is essentially a building that breathes. When heat is caught in the chimney, cold air is attracted to it, entering through the facade. The cold air is pulled across the floor plate into the building and upward where it disperses.

Bobtrade, innovation, skyscrapers, construction, materials, building, supplies[Photo Credit: Buro Happold]

"The cold air is pulled across the floor plate into the building and upward where it disperses."

I think most people who work in offices would say they prefer fresh air over air conditioning - We know we would!

We can’t wait for the Tulip to join the London skyline and to see how the city develops in the coming year.

Tags: Creativity

AUTHOR
Alice-India Garwood

Alice-India Garwood

Content Marketing Executive at Bobtrade. Interested in design, sustainability and the history of construction. I love all things indie and theatrical.